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20110301
20110331
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CSPAN2 12
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English 12
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Mar 21, 2011 12:00am EDT
behaviors led to the subprime crisis. >> host: when you talk about what we've done wrong in america and other western nations as well, part of it is we live for today. we consume. we go for the free lunch. elaborate on that. >> guest: yeah, i think what we're also facing in places like the united states is the competition or the sort of test between the current generation and the future generation. we have to decide whether there are going to be sacrifices which are what i'm arguing in the book, sacrifices for people today so that the united states tomorrow can remain a preimminent economic power. clearly, there were promises made, pensions is a classic example of this that a unsustainable. it's impossible to fulfill those promises and the question then becomes how much of a sacrifice are people willing to make today in the united states to make sure that tomorrow we can have educated, a reasonably educated public and infrastructure and so on. >> host: what happens if we don't make the sacrifice? that's your warning in the book. because we're on a wrong path and short termism and co
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 9:00pm EDT
. >> host: when you talk about what was done wrong in america and other western nations as well, part of it is that we live for today, we go for the free lunch. the elaborate on that. >> host: i think what we are also facing right now in places like the united states is the competition over the sort of test between the current generation and the future generation. we have to decide whether there are going to be sacrifices which is what i'm arguing in the book, sacrifice is for people to face of the united states tomorrow can remain a preeminent economic power. clearly there were promises that were made, pensions is an example but is unsustainable and it is going to be impossible to fulfil the promises and so the question then becomes how much of a sacrifice are people willing to meet today in the united states to make sure that tomorrow we can have a reasonably educated population and the infrastructure and so on. >> host: what happens if we don't make the sacrifice because that is your warning in the book that because we are on this wrong path and because they're seems to be this sho
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 12:00pm EDT
housing america and liberty nor safety are both with outside publishers. but we do both. >> thank you very much for your time. >> thank you so much. ♪ >> up next, booktv presents "after words," an hourlong program where we invite guest hosts to interview authors. peter firstbrook explores the history of the paternal side of president obama's family in his new book, "the obamas." .. >> host: in some sense we might expect your book to be called the untold story of an american family, but it's the untold story of an african family. why did you choose to focus on the side of the family heritage and what is its significance. >> guest: when the american people elect a president they also elect the leader of the free world. you only have to see what's happening this week in cairo to know that the decisions made now in the white house are going to affect the lives of 85 million egyptians. and so i sometimes think the american people don't fully appreciate just a big a deal it is when there's a new american president because he does have this very powerful influential position for the re
CSPAN
Mar 13, 2011 9:00pm EDT
. so let's talk more about barack obama, senior's world. he came to america in 1959. he went to hawaii. you referred to in 1965 essay he wrote in which problems facing out socialism and he called himself an african socialist. do you think -- you describe that essay in the context of the dates within kenya, and it was in effect when we think of intercolonial some we think that there are different species of anticolonialism. there was the pro-western amoore market and there was tom, obama's father's mentor and more on the left and then on the far left basically pro-soviet and so you have these species of anticolonialism. talk a little about that landscape because i think it is fascinating people think of anticolonialism as one thing but it actually has many different. >> guest: it was an exciting time in kenya because they had at long last of their independence from the british in 1963 and all the students in the american universities were pouring back into nairobi to get the jobs in government and most of which were vacated by the british who were going home. and so it was a very exciti
CSPAN
Mar 14, 2011 12:00am EDT
obama senior's world. he came to america in 1959, he went to hawaii. you refer to a 1965 essay that he wrote and which problems facing us are socialism and he called himself an african specialist. to describe that essay in the context of debates within kenya and it was. when we think of anticolonialism we think there are different species of anticolonialism. it was more pro-western, more pre-market, it was tom, obama's tauter's mentor. he was more on the left and then on the far left and he was basically pro-soviet and so you have these species of anticolonialism. talk a little bit about that landscape. it's fascinating people often think about anticolonialism as one thing, but it actually has many different colors. >> guest: it was an exciting time in kenya because they had at long last gotten their independence in 1963 and all the students in the american universities for all pulling back into my robie to get jobs in government most of which had been vacated by the british who were going home. and was a very exciting time in which the government would try to find out really what sort
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 11:00pm EST
in 1966, 67, we were tried for the death sentence, and this is during those years in america where all of the major cities in this country were on fire. when africans in america as we came to call ourselves were standing up against these institutionalized states demanding equal justice, equal opportunity, equal voting rights, equal jobs coming equal housing and equal respect. that was a society i grew up with at that time. when i went on trial it was an all white jury. if they would have burned us to the degree lined the only evidence that even suggested we have reason to do such a thing was conflicts who were in the area that night breaking into a factory and robbing the dead bodies in this bar and grill and this one person who was supposed to be the lookout list of cigarettes and walked to the bar and grill which was a block away and as he was walking up to the bar and grill they saw them coming around the corner laughing, carrying a shotgun and john was carrying a pistol he ran away and we couldn't catch him. now this was a little fat boy. he was about 5-foot seven. >> host: and tha
CSPAN
Mar 12, 2011 10:00pm EST
concentrated on his life in america and there's another whole half to obama that i felt was really being -- not being addressed and that was his kenyan side. and so when he was elected president in november, i decided that it would be really interesting to go out to kenya and research and explore the background and i intended to make a documentary. that was my originally idea on the way in which his village ogello was going to change in the next 12 months because they being the focus of the news attention and i thought that would be interesting but having search and being redirected to kindu bay where the obamas were from i realized that wasn't really the story to tell but it was a remarkable transformation of a family -- you go back two generations on obama, he was born in 1895. he was actually born in an iron age family. >> that's the father of barack obama, sr. so the president's grandfather. >> the president's paternal grandfather. and he's a big figure in this story as you might imagine. he was born in 1895. he was brought up in a society that hadn't had any contact with white peopl
CSPAN
Mar 5, 2011 10:00pm EST
for the death penalty. and this was during the years in america when all of the major cities in this country was on fire. when africans in america or black people as we came to call ourselves were standing up against this institutionalized hatred demanding equal justice, equal opportunity, equal voting rights, equal jobs, equal housing. >> host: right. >> guest: and all of those -- and e respect, you know? -- equal respect, you know? that was the, that was the society that i grew up at that time. and when i went on trial, i went on trial with an all-white jury. now, if that all-white jury had thought for one second that john artis and i had murdered those people, they would have burned us to a baking -- [inaudible] but the only evidence that even suggested that we had anything to do with such a thing was two convicts who were in the area that night breaking into a factory and robbing the dead bodies in this lafayette bar and grill. and this one person who was supposed to be the lookout ran out of cigarettes and walked up to the lafayette bar and grill which is a block away. and as he was wal
CSPAN
Mar 6, 2011 9:00pm EST
years in america where all the major cities in the country were on fire. we are standing up against it institutionalized hatred demanding equal justice, equals opportunity, equal voting rights, equal jobs, equal housing and equal respect. that was the society i grew up in that time and when i went on trial live and on trial in all white jury. if they thought for one second that we had murdered those people they would have to a baking, but the only evidence that suggested that we would do such things was to conduct some who were in the area that might breaking into a factory and robbing dead bodies and this one person who was supposed to be the lookout ran out of cigarettes and walked up to the bar and grill which is a block away and as he was walking up to the bar and grill he said that he saw me and john coming around the corner laughing with me carrying a shotgun and john carrying a pistol. and we couldn't catch him. now this was a little fat boy. he was about 5-foot seven. post, and that was the basis of the conviction? >> guest: that was the basis of the conviction and the reaso
CSPAN
Mar 20, 2011 6:00pm EDT
corporations and is the current chairman of the board of teach for america. walter lives in washington, d.c. with his wife and daughter. in november of 2003 when walter spoke this put him about his best-selling book on benjamin franklin i had the honor of introducing him and i compared him to mr. franklin. ausley remarked among other similarities how both men changed course in mid life from careers in the media to become involved in education, public policy and world affairs. while doing research for this introduction i came upon a similarity between isaacson and his current subject albert einstein walter said that one of the major attractions in writing this book on einstein was neinstein's creativity and refusal to conform as you can see from the risks, choices and changes isaacson has made in his own life by being a journalist, businessman, biographer and educator and he also is a creative thinker and nonconformist. it is my pleasure to introduce walter isaacson. [applause] >> that was very nice. thank you so much. that is far too high. nobody's ever compared me to neinstein. [laughter
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)